2013 Articles 

The Beginning

July 23, 2013

 

On the topic of ‘body’, I will discuss the eye: anatomy, disease, and prevention options. The best way to prevent or care for a disease is to vigilantly follow your doctor’s advice and/or prescription. A well informed patient is a more compliant one.
My first topic will be regarding cataracts. I found many of my patients shared some common misconceptions concerning cataracts. This sparked the idea to create this information corner where I’ll try to answer prospective topic questions. In the future, I’ll discuss other interests I find to be particularly concerning to patients and suggestions are highly appreciated.

 

Cataracts

August 7, 2013

 

What is a Cataract?

 

 A cataract forms when the internal lens of the eye becomes cloudy. Let us first do a crash course on the anatomy of the eye. (see illustration 1) The crystalline lens, or lens for short, is located behind the iris... the clear part of your eye. The best way I explain cataracts to my patients is comparing it to a dirty car windshield or glasses. Depending on how dirty these surfaces are determines the amount in which vision is affected. Patients could live with cataracts for years and hold off on going through surgery. You may have heard the term “your cataracts are not ripe yet”. This phrase means the lens has not yet clouded up enough to affect vision detrimentally. When the cataract finally ripens, it becomes so clouded that vision is significantly worsened and cataract removal will be recommended.

 

Cataract Surgery in the Past/What is the Goal to Prayer

August 21, 2013

 

Last week we learned what cataracts are and where they are located (refer to last articles on Facebook or EyeMazing Optical.com). Humans were trying to figure out how they could restore one’s vision as far back as the 5th century BC as determined from Sanskrit manuscripts. 1 In those times, only very advanced cataracts could be treated with the technique called couching.2 In this technique, the cataract is detached and made to fall backwards into the vitreous by striking the eye with sufficient force to cause the zonules that hold the lens in place to break allowing the lens to fall back. Later on this procedure was ‘improved ’ by inserting a needlelike object into the eye to break the zonules.3 In 29 AD, the technique called needling or discussion was developed.4 In this procedure, a needle was inserted into the eye to slice up the cataract into smaller parts so that the body could easily absorb it. There are many problems with all these techniques such as infection, inflammation and blurry vision. 
 

 

The Evolution of the Intraocular Lens Implant/The Goal to Prayer & How We Get There Part 2


September 13, 2013

 

As cataract surgery and the removal of the cataract improved, there was still no viable option until after the first half of the 20th century with ...the exception of extremely strong and heavy glasses to correct vision. The problem was finding a way insert an intraocular lens (i.e. a lens implant inside the eye) that would not cause the patient’s immune system to have an inflammatory reaction and reject the implant.
The first intraocular lens, or IOL, that caused no inflammatory reaction was performed in 1795. Casaamata, the court oculist in Dresden, used glass for the first intraocular lens implant, but there was a problem.1 The implant dislocated and fell back into the eye due to its weight.2 To solve this, a lighter, inert implant needed to be invented to bring natural vision to fruition.
The discovery of the material to be used for IOL occurred during World War II. An on-duty British Ophthalmologist, Sir Harold Ridley observed an interesting fact about the pilots he treated with certain eye injuries. Pilots who had small pieces of the planes cupolas imbedded in their eyes showed no inflammatory reaction to it. The material used in the cupolas was made from PMMA. Using this information, he then created the first successful artificial lens from this material.3
 

 

The Evolution of the Intraocular Lens Implant/The Goal to Prayer & How We Get There Part 2


September 13, 2013

 

As cataract surgery and the removal of the cataract improved, there was still no viable option until after the first half of the 20th century with ...the exception of extremely strong and heavy glasses to correct vision. The problem was finding a way insert an intraocular lens (i.e. a lens implant inside the eye) that would not cause the patient’s immune system to have an inflammatory reaction and reject the implant.
The first intraocular lens, or IOL, that caused no inflammatory reaction was performed in 1795. Casaamata, the court oculist in Dresden, used glass for the first intraocular lens implant, but there was a problem.1 The implant dislocated and fell back into the eye due to its weight.2 To solve this, a lighter, inert implant needed to be invented to bring natural vision to fruition.
The discovery of the material to be used for IOL occurred during World War II. An on-duty British Ophthalmologist, Sir Harold Ridley observed an interesting fact about the pilots he treated with certain eye injuries. Pilots who had small pieces of the planes cupolas imbedded in their eyes showed no inflammatory reaction to it. The material used in the cupolas was made from PMMA. Using this information, he then created the first successful artificial lens from this material.3
 

 

Merry Christmas!!


December 24, 2013

 

When John the Baptist heard in prison of the works of the Messiah, he sent his disciples to Him with this question, “Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?”   Mt 11:2-3

 

Doubt can be a good, powerful tool that can be used to deepen your faith.   The great John the Baptist had his own doubts of Jesus at that moment in prison, but he knew where to seek the answer.   He asked Jesus and He answered him.  John the Baptist was expecting a different kind of Messiah and to John’s credit, he did not lose faith because his expectations were not met.   He was humble enough to open his eyes, ears and heart to hear Jesus’ reply.   May we also learn from the Baptist to be humble and seek Jesus for the answers and accept the reply that may not be what we expected.    

 

 

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San Antonio, TX 78232
 

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